Posts tagged with illness


Since [2008], the [US] labor force participation rate (LFPR) has dropped from 66 percent to 63 percent. [Out of 314M people.] Many people have left the labor force because they are discouraged … (U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics data indicate that a little under 1 million people fall into this category)….
…Knowing the reasons why people have left (or delayed entering) the labor force can help us [guess] how much of the ↓ might … ↑ if the economy ↑ and how much is permanent. (For more on this topic, see here, here, and here.)

The chart … shows the distribution of reasons in the fourth quarter of 2013…. Young people [usually say they] are not in the labor force … because they are in school. Individuals 25 to 50 years old who are not in the labor force mostly [say they] are taking care of their family or house. After age 50, disability or illness becomes the primary reason [given]—until around age 60, when retirement begins to dominate.
…
Of the 12.6 million increase in individuals not in the labor force, about 2.3 million come from people ages 16 to 24, and of that subset, about 1.9 million can be attributed to an increase in school attendance (see the chart below).

—Ellyn Terry

HT @conorsen
off-topic sidenote: the natural cohort —vs— year adjustments, like “the baby boom has shifted 7 years since 7 years ago” are an economic example of the covariant/contravariant distinction

Since [2008], the [US] labor force participation rate (LFPR) has dropped from 66 percent to 63 percent. [Out of 314M people.] Many people have left the labor force because they are discouraged … (U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics data indicate that a little under 1 million people fall into this category)….

…Knowing the reasons why people have left (or delayed entering) the labor force can help us [guess] how much of the ↓ might … ↑ if the economy ↑ and how much is permanent. (For more on this topic, see herehere, and here.)

The chart … shows the distribution of reasons in the fourth quarter of 2013…. Young people [usually say they] are not in the labor force … because they are in school. Individuals 25 to 50 years old who are not in the labor force mostly [say they] are taking care of their family or house. After age 50, disability or illness becomes the primary reason [given]—until around age 60, when retirement begins to dominate.

Of the 12.6 million increase in individuals not in the labor force, about 2.3 million come from people ages 16 to 24, and of that subset, about 1.9 million can be attributed to an increase in school attendance (see the chart below).

Ellyn Terry

image

HT @conorsen

off-topic sidenote: the natural cohort —vs— year adjustments, like “the baby boom has shifted 7 years since 7 years ago” are an economic example of the covariant/contravariant distinction


hi-res




  • "I wanted to be pissed about my breast cancer"
  • "They wanted to be angry about being laid off"
  • "It’s untrue that a positive attitude boosting the immune system increases the odds of withstanding cancer" "I have a Ph.D in cellular immunology"
  • Quantum physics become an excuse to mock all of science
  • "I didn’t come out of cancer more spiritual or a better person. If anything I’m a little meaner and more cynical"
  • There is no “real world”, there’s the real world through my positive mood and the real world through my bad mood.

Smile or Die by Barbara Ehrenreich