Posts tagged with commerce

The $400 billion US retail grocery industry includes about 40,000 companies that operate 70,000 grocery stores (excluding convenience stores).

About 50 large national and regional chains like Kroger, Albertsons, Ahold, and Safeway hold more than 60 percent of the market. The industry is highly concentrated: 500 companies that own more than five stores control 80 percent of the market.

First Research

(Source: edsuite.com)




179 Plays

BHP Billiton from The Economist

  • the cut and thrust of dealmaking
  • putting finance types in the C suite rather than engineers
  • diversifying as mines are both very large and financially volatile




49 Plays

An interesting story about industrial rail in the United States. About 20 mins. From The Economist.

commercial railways in the United States

  • Europe has an impressive and growing network of high-speed passenger links
  • America’s freight railways are one of the unsung transport successes of the past 30 years.
  • Before deregulation America’s railways were going bust. … By 1980 a fifth of rail mileage was owned by bankrupt firms.
     
  • Since 1981 productivity has risen by 172%, after years of stagnation. Adjusted for inflation, rates are down by 55% 
  • Coal is the biggest single cargo, accounting for 45% by volume and 23% by value.
  • since 1990 the average horsepower of their fleet has risen by 72%
  • [since 1990] the number of ton-miles per (American) gallon of fuel [rose] from 332 to 457—an improvement of 38%
  • But the fastest-growing part of rail freight has been "intermodal" traffic: containers or truck trailers loaded on to flat railcars. The number of such shipments rose from 3m in 1980 to 12.3m in 2006, before the downturn caused a slight falling back.
  • one freight train can carry as much as 280 lorries can

(Source: )




Diamond Mining Complex by Laura del Pino
via planetaryfolklore, drawingarchitecture

hi-res




via n-morgan:

they’re facing each other in court over a rebranding accusation. They’re locked in a legal and public relations fight in the United States over a plan to change the name of the toxic and healthy sweeter, high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS).




"By 1881, annual tea production in India had reached roughly 50 million pounds."
—Reversals of Fortune in the Tea Industry Part XXIV: The Cutty Sark under Captain William Bruce

hi-res




kiameku:

Doug Aitken Black Mirror 2011
Those who leave aren’t happy, content people. They’re different from those who settled in the past. They aren’t people who push over mountains and found cities. They’re not seeking homes and security. They’re restless … moving outwards for adventure and quick money. They live in the present and chase the future. They move from place to place with little trace. Alive. Circulating. Their world is borderless. Its countries are projections, holograms, invisible grids of opinions and electronic impluses. Their identities continuously transform. They work to perfect the art of disappearance. These people are the products of a world that has lost track of information; a world saturated with change. This is a story of individuals who are part of a vast sprawling machine …  people who live fast nomadic lives in the shadows. They move in perpetual shorthand, communicating in quick pulses. They travel log distances for short meetings and depart as soon as possible. This is modern trade; how things move; how things are bought and sold. Before they lived this live each of these individuals experienced a symbolic death, involving the total abandonment of all previous live: mothers, fathers,  brothers and sisters who would perhaps never be seen again. All sentiment banished; all comforts relinquished. They left where they had come from to find a place in this system … reborn in this modern wilderness as new creatures adapting to a new condition. It doesn’t matter what happened in the past ore where things are headed …  there is no nostalgia; only “the now.” The language here is tha language of change. No man or woman who lives this life can return unchanged.


http://kiameku.tumblr.com/post/35495072818/doug-aitken-black-mirror-i-lost-track-of
I lost track of information. I was blitzed by opinion. I began to see opinions in the air, intersecting flight patterns …
I began to see the country itself as a projection on air, a kind of hologram, an invisible grid of image and opinion …  —Joan Didion, The White Album, 1979.




Just about everything in our world is relative.We are being lied to, and know it.…We accept the half-truths— and fictions…we lose touch…

kiameku:

Doug Aitken
Black Mirror
2011

Those who leave aren’t happy, content people.
They’re different from those who settled in the past.
They aren’t people who push over mountains and found cities.
They’re not seeking homes and security.
They’re restless … moving outwards for adventure and quick money.
They live in the present and chase the future.
They move from place to place with little trace.
Alive. Circulating.
Their world is borderless.
Its countries are projections, holograms, invisible grids of opinions and
electronic impluses.
Their identities continuously transform.
They work to perfect the art of disappearance.
These people are the products of a world that has lost track of information;
a world saturated with change.
This is a story of individuals who are part of a vast sprawling machine …
people who live fast nomadic lives in the shadows.
They move in perpetual shorthand, communicating in quick pulses.
They travel log distances for short meetings and depart as soon as possible.
This is modern trade; how things move; how things are bought and sold.
Before they lived this live each of these individuals experienced a symbolic
death, involving the total abandonment of all previous live: mothers, fathers,
brothers and sisters who would perhaps never be seen again.
All sentiment banished; all comforts relinquished.
They left where they had come from to find a place in this system … reborn
in this modern wilderness as new creatures adapting to a new condition.
It doesn’t matter what happened in the past ore where things are headed …
there is no nostalgia; only “the now.”
The language here is tha language of change.
No man or woman who lives this life can return unchanged.

http://kiameku.tumblr.com/post/35495072818/doug-aitken-black-mirror-i-lost-track-of

I lost track of information.
I was blitzed by opinion.
I began to see opinions in the air,
intersecting flight patterns …

I began to see the country itself
as a projection on air,
a kind of hologram, an invisible grid
of image and opinion …
—Joan Didion, The White Album, 1979.

Just about everything in our world is relative.
We are being lied to, and know it.

We accept the half-truths— and fictions…
we lose touch…


hi-res




Nice internet things don’t come for free.

What’s said here of cable television is true as well of newspapers and any website that doesn’t charge you through a paywall. If you’re not paying, someone else is. They’re paying for your headspace, which they want because they’re going to convince you to give your IOU’s to them.

via static-void

(Source: some-velvet-morning)










Freitag Container Retail Building
via tstitt

Freitag Container Retail Building

via tstitt


hi-res




For reasons that are totally none of your business, the other day I was looking up a Wikipedia article on “Bills of Lading”. The article had been deleted because its text had been unambiguously plagiarised from another source. That source was a book titled

Ocean bills of lading: traditional forms, substitutes, and EDI systems by Athanassios N. Yiannapoulos.

Not a topic I would think anyone could write 280 pages about! But what do I know? Apparently not that much about ocean bills of lading, whether traditional, substitutes, or EDI.

Here’s a quote from the page Wikipedia linked to:

That’s right:

The shipper always has the right under the Hague-Visby rules that a traditional “shipped” bill of lading be issued and this renders the sea waybill nugatory.

Nugatory, Captain.