Posts tagged with coffee

Sumatra

hi-res




Although partial least squares regression was not designed for classification and discrimination, it is … used for these purposes. For example, PLS has been used to:

  • • distinguish Alzheimer’s, senile dementia of the Alzheimer’s type, and vascular dementia
  • • discriminate between Arabica and Robusta coffee beans
  • • classify waste water pollution
  • • separate active and inactive compounds in a quantitative structure-activity relationship study
  • • differentiate two types of hard red wheat using near-infrared analysis
  • • distinguish transsexualism, borderline personality disorder and controls using a standard instrument
  • • determine the year of vintage port wine
  • • classify soy sauce by geographic region
  • • determine emission sources in ambient aerosol studies
Matthew Barker and William Rayens

(Source: enpub.fulton.asu.edu)




OK, not every day. But whenever I shop for packaged retail goods like a coffee or in the grocers.

The Pythagorean theorem demonstrates that a slightly larger circle has twice as much area as a slightly smaller circle.

Pythagorean Theorem  This is how I first really understood the Pythagorean Theorem.  The outer circle looks just a little bit larger than the inner circle. But actually, its area is twice as large.  Kind of like the difference between medium and large soda cups, or how a tiny house still requires kind of a lot of timber, for how much air it encloses. If you buy a slightly wider pizza or cake it will serve proportionally more people; and if an inverse-square force (sound, radio power, light brightness) expands a little bit more it will lose a lot of its energy.  Ideas involved here:  scaling properties of squared quantities(gravitational force, skin, paint, loudness, brightness)  circumcircle & incircle  2  This is also how I first really understood 2, now my favourite number.

(Since the diagonal of that square is √2 long relative to the "1" of the interior radius=leg of the right triangle. So the outer radius=hypotenuse=√2, and √2 squared is 2.)

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And some of us know from Volume Integrals in calculus class that a cylinder's volume = circle area × height — and something like a sausage with a fat middle, or a cup with a wider mouth than base, can be thought of as a “stack” of circle areas
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or in the case of a tapered glass, a “rectangle minus triangle” (when the circle is collapsed so just looking at base-versus-height “camera straight ahead on the table” view).

image

The shell-or-washer-method volume integral lessons were, I think, supposed to teach about symbolic manipulation, but I got a sense of what shapes turn out to be big or small volume as well.

http://2.bp.blogspot.com/__wa77chrZVg/SuRA4fj-l8I/AAAAAAAADHM/quRNFMVeHmk/s400/Chou_pei.jpg

By integrating dheight sized slices of circles that make up a larger 3-D shape, I can apply the inverse-square lesson of the Pythagorean theorem to how real-life “cylinders” or “cylinder-like things” will compare in volume.

  • A regulation Ultimate Frisbee can hold 6 beers. (It’s flat/short, but really wide)
    File:Frisbee Catch- Fcb981.jpg
    image
  • The “large” size may not look much bigger but its volume can in fact be.
    image
  • Starbucks keeps the base of their Large cups small, I think, to make the large size look noticeably larger (since we apparently perceive the height difference better than the circle difference). (Maybe also so they fit in cup holders in cars.)




There is an … interest in providing frictionless experiences, making life extremely easy. However, sometimes at least, we require friction in the same way that we require sadness….

A frictionless start of the morning would be to have an instant coffee (anathema) or to have an automatic machine with a timer that grinds the coffee and makes a ding! sound that wakes us up. This machine would also produce a perfectly consistent cup of coffee. There would be no ritual involved.

In my start there is pouring water in the bottom of the mocha pot, setting the coffee container, filling it up with ground coffee (but not compacting it), carefully cleaning the borders, and screwing the top part of the pot. Then I turn on the stove, wait a few minutes (until the top container is between half and three quarters full) and removing the pot from the stove. One can see the crema on top of the liquid. I will have some milk and (little) sugar with it.

The coffee is never exactly the same, never perfect. It requires some work and distracts my mind for a moment. I don’t want to work on improving it…. I will not spend a lot on a ‘brand’ mocha pot, or on sophisticated cups, or on a spectacular coffee grinder. It would be transforming the ritual into religion, which is not the point.

Luis Apiolaza (@zentree)

(Source: apiolaza.net)




"By 1881, annual tea production in India had reached roughly 50 million pounds."
—Reversals of Fortune in the Tea Industry Part XXIV: The Cutty Sark under Captain William Bruce

hi-res




handbill advertising coffee circa 1650

produced by the first coffee shop in London, in St. Michael’s Alley, Cornhill

via boing-boing, via Brad DeLong

hi-res




I can afford to consume each of

  1. chocolate
  2. cheese
  3. tea/coffee
  4. fruit

multiple times per week. I think that qualifies me as Pretty Goddam Lucky.




Fair Trade cocoa price, 1996-2006
You can see from the above graph that fair trade certifiers aim not just to raise, but to raise and stabilise the price a farmer or cooperative receives for produce.

Fact: There are many fair trade certifying bodies, this data comes from Flo-CERT GmbH, a non-profit based in Bonn. Flo-CERT pays X employees to verify that cocoa, coffee, and other popular consumption products are farmed and sold according to Fair Trade standards.
How much extra are you willing to pay these people (their efforts are part of the extra cost of fair trade goods) so that the farmers are guaranteed predictable revenues?
Fact 2: The loathèd corporation Starbucks has been paying stable above-market rates for their coffee for years.


Fact 3: The charts above depict a one-dimensional price. Of course each coffee/cocoa bean is unique; so is every farm and every farmer. For a commodity to be traded from hand to hand to hand, it needs to be standardised. But a big buyer like Starbucks which deals through its own channels with farmers might pay a higher price simply because it’s also requiring a higher grade of beans — thus leaving the middle quality ones to be sold at the regular market rate.
Conclusion: Nothing is as simple or clear-cut as it at first seems.

Fair Trade cocoa price, 1996-2006

You can see from the above graph that fair trade certifiers aim not just to raise, but to raise and stabilise the price a farmer or cooperative receives for produce.

image

Fact: There are many fair trade certifying bodies, this data comes from Flo-CERT GmbH, a non-profit based in Bonn. Flo-CERT pays X employees to verify that cocoa, coffee, and other popular consumption products are farmed and sold according to Fair Trade standards.

How much extra are you willing to pay these people (their efforts are part of the extra cost of fair trade goods) so that the farmers are guaranteed predictable revenues?

Fact 2: The loathèd corporation Starbucks has been paying stable above-market rates for their coffee for years.

image

image

Fact 3: The charts above depict a one-dimensional price. Of course each coffee/cocoa bean is unique; so is every farm and every farmer. For a commodity to be traded from hand to hand to hand, it needs to be standardised. But a big buyer like Starbucks which deals through its own channels with farmers might pay a higher price simply because it’s also requiring a higher grade of beans — thus leaving the middle quality ones to be sold at the regular market rate.

Conclusion: Nothing is as simple or clear-cut as it at first seems.


hi-res







From nature to hardware to software in less time than it takes to drink a Starbucks Trenta. I love this.

In about seven minutes (5:00 to 12:00) he goes from

  1. Maxwell’s Laws, to
  2. lumped circuit elements, to
  3. simple circuits, to
  4. processors, to
  5. operating systems, to
  6. programming languages, to
  7. video games.

Also to toasters and spaceship control modules.

(Source: ocw.mit.edu)